Volcanoes of the Pacific Northwest

We hadn’t realized how many volcanoes there are in the pacific northwest and soon learned that this area belongs to the Pacific Ring of Fire which contains 75% of the worlds active or dormant volcanoes, After exploring Olympic National Park, we headed south toward Mount Rainier and what would become a volcanic tour of the northwest. We spent the most time at Rainier but also visited Mount St. Helens, Mount Hood, and Newberry Volcanic National Monument.

Mount Rainier National Park

Our first day in Mount Rainier National Park, we hiked the Pinnacle Peak Saddle trail. The trail was a short and sweet with a total distance of 2.4 miles and an elevation gain of 1000 ft. The hike was packed with colorful wildflowers and when we reached the “saddle” we had amazing views of Mt. Rainier on one side and Mt. Adams on the other.

The next day we hiked to Pebble Creek via the Skyline Trail. This hike ended up being around 8 miles with 2500 ft. in elevation gain. When we reached Pebble Creek we felt as if we were so close to the top of the mountain. The glacier views from this point were unbelievable and we could even hear ice falls on the mountain that sounded like thunder.

The best part about this park is that you can be anywhere in the park and still get a fantastic view of Mt. Rainier. On our last day at the park, we drove up to the Sunrise area on north end of the mountain. After parking we hiked up to Mount Fremont lookout for spectacular view once again. It was not easy to leave this majestic mountain!

Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument

Just before crossing into the Oregon border, we made quick stop at Mount St. Helens to hike the nature trail near the visitor center. Although the hike was short, we learned so much about the vicious eruption that took place only 40 years ago! The destruction left behind is still very evident and it was interesting to see how the plant and animal life has made its way back.

Mount Hood National Forest

On our way east across Oregon, we stopped for a couple of nights in Mount Hood National Forest. Mount Hood is another stratovolcano that dominates horizon and can easily be seen from Portland. We hiked the Bald Mountain and Muddy Fork trail which was a little under 6 miles and gained 1200 ft. in elevation. The trail wound through the forest and eventually went downhill into a valley at the base of Mount Hood. This made for a nice lunch spot!

Newberry National Volcanic Monument

While we were near Bend, OR, we visited Newberry National Volcanic Monument located in Deschutes National Forest. Our first stop was the Lava Lands area to check out a cinder cone and a large lava flow below it. While we were there we stopped by the visitor center to bird for a bit and saw a Cooper’s Hawk (or maybe a Sharp-shinned Hawk). We then headed to the Newberry Caldera to see Paulina Falls, Paulina Peak and the Big Obsidian Flow. The Big Obsidian Flow was especially unique because it was completely made up of black volcanic glass. So beautiful!

Takeaways

The many volcanoes of the northwest are not only beautiful part of the natural landscape, but allow for a glimpse into the past and provide some education about the earth’s formation. All of the volcanoes we visited are still active and you can not help but wonder when they will erupt again.

Thanks for reading!

-Alan & Ashby

Click here for more photos from our volcanic adventures!

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