Redwood National Park

Having already sought out some very tall trees on the Olympic Peninsula, we could not wait to walk amongst some of the tallest trees in the world. Redwood National Park is in northern California on the Pacific coast. We spent two days exploring the park.

Tall Trees Grove

The tall trees grove is an area known to have some the tallest trees in the park and, subsequently, in the world. Redwood trees in this area tower to heights 350+ feet! Access to this area is allowed by permit only and we were lucky enough to acquire one a week before our visit. This trail is one of the more difficult to access, besides the permit we had to drive 7 miles down a dirt road to a small parking lot which thankfully the van fit into.

Tall Trees Grove

From the trailhead, we hiked 2 miles down 800 ft of elevation to Redwood Creek where the Tall Trees Grove lives. A one mile loop took us through the grove and we had to keep stopping at each colossal Redwood we came to and ponder its mass. After the grove loop, we hike along Redwood Creek for a bit then returned up to the trailhead.

Tree hugger
Leaning on a friend.

Prairie Creek

After our Tall Trees hike, we grabbed the last available spot at Elk Prairie campground and bedded down for the evening. The next day we went to the visitor center then explored some of the nearby points of interest including Big Tree and Corkscrew Tree. Big Tree is not the tallest in the area but is known to have one of the widest trunks among other trees in the park with a diameter of 23 feet. Corkscrew Tree is truly a unique site which is saying something when you are surrounded by 300 foot tall trees! It consists of four trees intertwined in a corkscrew pattern that reach skyward together.

Big Tree
Corkscrew Tree

Takeaways

It is truly difficult to get a scale of the size of the Coastal Redwoods at this awesome park. We could tell they were enormous but since every tree is so big, we had no comparison to the “tall” pines of the Piney Woods back home. We plan to come back and hike more of the many trails that wind through these giants of nature and continue to be humbled.

Thanks for reading!

-Alan

See gallery below for more photos from our Redwood adventure!

Volcanoes of the Pacific Northwest Photo Gallery

Mount Rainier National Park

Mount St. Helens Volcanic National Monument

Mount Hood National Forest

Newberry Volcanic National Monument

Summertime Fun

No one told us it would be so hot in Idaho! We thought we left the high 90 degree weather in Texas. Idaho sure fooled us! We left City of Rocks desperately craving some water fun. On our way to the Sawtooth Mountains we made a stop at the Morley Nelson Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area in Murphy, Idaho. We were able to find a free campsite on the Snake River nestled in this beautiful canyon. There were just a few people in the area so it felt like we had this gorgeous place to ourselves!

Can’t get any better than this!

We had such a great time soaking up the sun on the Snake River we made it a point to find more spots like this! The next day we drove into Boise to prepare for our upcoming backpacking trip. We drove out of Boise and headed east on the Ponderosa Pine Scenic Route. Along this drive, we found another amazing free campsite on the Payette River. Besides a family on the other side of the river, we also had this magical place all to ourselves. Alan set up our tent’s rain cover for shade and we used the river to keep the beer cold.

This water was very cold!

Thanks for reading!

-Ashby